Microlearning is an emerging approach in elearning which delivers short bursts of learning content — generally able to be completed in 20 minutes or less.

Because lessons are bite size, learners benefit from increased flexibility and are able to complete lessons ‘anywhere and anytime’, especially when delivered via mobile devices such as smartphone or tablet.

This approach encourages young and adult learners to complete courses, and can be highly effective in time-poor contexts such as job-embedded professional development, locations with limited internet connection, and as a complement to face-to-face learning.

Here at Catalpa, we specialise in microlearning programs for development…


January, February, March… Oh my! Now well-adapted to COVID ways-of-working, we’ve been collaborating with our dispersed team and partners to ensure communication remains strong and our projects on track.

Last week the Timor-Leste Vice Minister of Health and Australian Ambassador officially launched the Liga Inan program in Dili, marking the program’s availability nationwide. This is a remarkable milestone for a health program which began with a small pilot in 2013, and has now reached over 80,000 women across Timor-Leste.

Across the wider Asia-Pacific, we continue to grow our team and build local expertise for our programs. …


It’s International Women’s Day and we’re celebrating women who #choosetochallenge every day!

We asked our team to nominate an inspiring female team member who is committed to challenging the gender status quo in their everyday lives.

With too many nominations to cover, we’ve selected just a few of our outstanding team to give you a flavour of the passionate, driven women we are lucky enough to work with every day.


It’s International Women’s Day and we’re celebrating women who #choosetochallenge every day!

We asked our team to nominate an inspiring female team member who is committed to challenging the gender status quo in their everyday lives.

With too many nominations to cover, we’ve selected just a few of our outstanding team to give you a flavour of the passionate, driven women we are lucky enough to work with every day.


It’s International Women’s Day and we’re celebrating women who #choosetochallenge every day!

We asked our team to nominate an inspiring female team member who is committed to challenging the gender status quo in their everyday lives.

With too many nominations to cover, we’ve selected just a few of our outstanding team to give you a flavour of the passionate, driven women we are lucky enough to work with every day.


By Kara Chesal, Catalpa International; Dr Kate Sparks, Nanogirl Labs; Dee McDowall, Wintec

On International Day of Women and Girls in Science (Feb 11) we discuss the role of education in encouraging women and young people to pursue STEM careers in the Pacific.

Gender inequalities within the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) have been well documented over the years, with women now making up just 30% of STEM researchers globally.

Given the Pacific region sits below this average, with just 23.4% …


In a year that’s had more than its fair share of negatives, there sure have been a ton of positives.

We have seen communities come together for the greater good, friends and family reconnect, and a great deal of kindness as communities support each other through lockdowns and sickness. Above all, we have learned that when we work together, and support each other, we can achieve amazing things.

As for us, we’ve continued to grow across the Asia Pacific and beyond with projects underway in Myanmar, Fiji, Solomon Islands, Cook Islands, Vanuatu, Samoa, Papua New Guinea, Uzbekistan, and of course…


On International Day of Rural Women we discuss Timor-Leste, and how considered tech-for-development programs are contributing to change

It’s no secret that rural communities in developing countries face a unique set of challenges compared to their urban counterparts. Isolation, scarce resources, and poor access to basic services like clean water, education and health facilities are common.

In Timor-Leste, over 70% of the population live in rural areas and there is a significant geographical divide, with rural women and men having lower education, less employment, and higher poverty.¹

Yet the inequality doesn’t end there. Patriarchal social structures reinforce rigid gender norms, resulting in an inequitable division of responsibilities between men and women in both public and private life. …


The Olgeta pilot project set out to bridge the gap between unemployed youth and skilled jobs. Here’s what we learnt.

Finding a job can be stressful. Not only do you need the required skills for the job, you need confidence to put yourself out there, and an intrinsic belief you can succeed.

For young people living in rural villages, gaining these basic skills can be a challenge. With limited internet connectivity and few opportunities to build their work experience, the temptation to venture out into the wider workforce can be understandably low.

It’s a challenge rural youth in developing nations are regularly faced with.

In the Solomon Islands, only 20% of people aged 15–24 are employed, yet there is an…

Catalpa International

Creating a more equitable world through tech + design | www.catalpa.io

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